The Electrical Installation Report (EICR) is a document which shows the state and present condition of any electrical installation within a particular location. The report is also commonly known as a periodic inspection, landlord electrical certificate, or home condition reports. The process of carrying out a periodic inspection is highly essential because installations, appliances and electrical devices naturally wear out and deteriorate. To prevent unexpected fires and accidents, you should carry out periodic inspections at regular intervals.

The report can only be issued after a full periodic inspection and testing process has been carried out. The process has to do with tests such as electrical tests and virtual inspections of the installation. In simpler terms, EICR is a report which shows that an electrical installation has been perfectly carried out.

The findings from the testing are usually presented in a neatly organised manner. The report is averagely 8-9 pages long and at the end of the document, there’s a declaration which summarises the state of the electrical installation as either satisfactory or unsatisfactory.

How Often Should EICR be Carried Out?

Depending on what the installation is, how often it is being used, and the surrounding environment, the frequency of a periodic electrical testing varies from 1-5 years.

Most commercial businesses carry out the periodic testing every five years. However, a deterioration in the condition of the installation would mean that they need to conduct the testing at shorter intervals. This means that if you were operating at a 5-year interval, but noticed a deterioration in the installation, then you need to carry out an EICR more often.

Most workplace environments require a new Electrical Installation Condition Report to be showed every 5 years. This doesn’t mean they won’t carry out annual routine inspections. Routine inspections are necessary, and are not to be substituted for periodic inspections.

In restaurants, hotels, educational institutions, places of worship, offices, retail outlets, homes, and apartments, a 5-yearly fixed EICR is required. However, in places which typically have a high level of exposure to dust, heat or moisture, they are required to carry out their periodic testing every one to three years. This is because they are more prone to dust and other factors which are likely to affect them.

Who Should Sort Out an EICR?

Typically, it is the landlord’s duty to ensure that an EICR is carried out. The landlord can either choose to carry out the periodic testing every 5 years or at the start of each tenancy. The landlord must also have evidence to show that a registered electrician carried out the testing. There have been cases of electricians stating that an installation was satisfactory, only for the same Installation to result into electrocutions and fires. This is why for an electrician to prove his competency, he has to have at least a level 3 periodic qualification. This proves that he is experienced and qualified, reducing the risk of such installations and ensuring safety.

How Much Does an EICR Cost?

This also depends on where the location is, how old the property is, and how much testing is required. The cost of carrying out a periodic testing basically varies from one place to the other. For one-bedroom flats, EICR costs £120 while a five-bedroom house costs £300 to carry out a standard periodic testing.

In Leicester, if one wished to insure a property, insurers usually require an EICR report before they can proceed with the insurance. For a 2-bedroom flat in Leicester, EICR reports usually cost between 100-250 pounds.

Before one can get an EICR in Leicester, one needs a team of experts to carry out a complete testing. These experts are the ones who will ascertain that the property is safe and is not dangerous. They are the ones who test every appliance and Installation, seeking for anything out of place and monitoring the slightest reaction of these installations to normal situations. Their experience allows them to know what to look out for while conducting an EICR. It also helps them pay closer attention to the installations than other electricians without adequate experience might do.

What Will the Testing Involve?

The periodic testing involves fixed appliances and wiring, such as plug sockets, fuse box, and light fittings. Equipment and permanent fixtures such as extractors and showers will also be inspected.

The electrician will ascertain if there are any overloaded installations. He will also find out if there are any fire hazards or likely risks from the electrical installations. Electrical appliances such as televisions, cookers, are not covered by the periodic testing.

The Final EICR Report

Landlords are usually required to obtain a report from the electrician in charge of the inspection. The test explains final outcomes and shows if more work such as remedial work is required. The report is to be submitted to the tenant within 28 days of the test.

Inspectors carrying out the test have certain codes they use to classify whether an installation is safe or if it requires urgent attention. Code 1 means “Danger Present.” While Code 2 means the Installation has potential risks.

Areas Where We Provide EICR Service

C & M Electricals provides Electrical Installation Condition Reports in areas across Leicestershire. Some of the areas are Clarendon Park, Knighton, Stoneygate, Aylestone, Westcotes, Winston, and Leicester City Centre.

The document will show that all installations are truly working as they should, helping you to prevent accidents and fire hazards. Your home should be the safest place for you, and what better way to make it safe than to carry out a periodic testing? This way, you can rest assured knowing that everything’s working correctly and you’re not in danger.

Related Articles

The Electrical Installation Report (EICR) is a document which shows the state and present condition of any electrical installation within a particular location. The report is also commonly known as a periodic inspection, landlord electrical certificate, or home condition reports. The process of carrying out a periodic inspection is highly essential because installations, appliances and electrical devices naturally wear out and deteriorate. To prevent unexpected fires and accidents, you should carry out periodic inspections at regular intervals.

The report can only be issued after a full periodic inspection and testing process has been carried out. The process has to do with tests such as electrical tests and virtual inspections of the installation. In simpler terms, EICR is a report which shows that an electrical installation has been perfectly carried out.

The findings from the testing are usually presented in a neatly organised manner. The report is averagely 8-9 pages long and at the end of the document, there’s a declaration which summarises the state of the electrical installation as either satisfactory or unsatisfactory.

How Often Should EICR be Carried Out?

Depending on what the installation is, how often it is being used, and the surrounding environment, the frequency of a periodic electrical testing varies from 1-5 years.

Most commercial businesses carry out the periodic testing every five years. However, a deterioration in the condition of the installation would mean that they need to conduct the testing at shorter intervals. This means that if you were operating at a 5-year interval, but noticed a deterioration in the installation, then you need to carry out an EICR more often.

Most workplace environments require a new Electrical Installation Condition Report to be showed every 5 years. This doesn’t mean they won’t carry out annual routine inspections. Routine inspections are necessary, and are not to be substituted for periodic inspections.

In restaurants, hotels, educational institutions, places of worship, offices, retail outlets, homes, and apartments, a 5-yearly fixed EICR is required. However, in places which typically have a high level of exposure to dust, heat or moisture, they are required to carry out their periodic testing every one to three years. This is because they are more prone to dust and other factors which are likely to affect them.

Who Should Sort Out an EICR?

Typically, it is the landlord’s duty to ensure that an EICR is carried out. The landlord can either choose to carry out the periodic testing every 5 years or at the start of each tenancy. The landlord must also have evidence to show that a registered electrician carried out the testing. There have been cases of electricians stating that an installation was satisfactory, only for the same Installation to result into electrocutions and fires. This is why for an electrician to prove his competency, he has to have at least a level 3 periodic qualification. This proves that he is experienced and qualified, reducing the risk of such installations and ensuring safety.

How Much Does an EICR Cost?

This also depends on where the location is, how old the property is, and how much testing is required. The cost of carrying out a periodic testing basically varies from one place to the other. For one-bedroom flats, EICR costs £120 while a five-bedroom house costs £300 to carry out a standard periodic testing.

In Leicester, if one wished to insure a property, insurers usually require an EICR report before they can proceed with the insurance. For a 2-bedroom flat in Leicester, EICR reports usually cost between 100-250 pounds.

Before one can get an EICR in Leicester, one needs a team of experts to carry out a complete testing. These experts are the ones who will ascertain that the property is safe and is not dangerous. They are the ones who test every appliance and Installation, seeking for anything out of place and monitoring the slightest reaction of these installations to normal situations. Their experience allows them to know what to look out for while conducting an EICR. It also helps them pay closer attention to the installations than other electricians without adequate experience might do.

What Will the Testing Involve?

The periodic testing involves fixed appliances and wiring, such as plug sockets, fuse box, and light fittings. Equipment and permanent fixtures such as extractors and showers will also be inspected.

The electrician will ascertain if there are any overloaded installations. He will also find out if there are any fire hazards or likely risks from the electrical installations. Electrical appliances such as televisions, cookers, are not covered by the periodic testing.

The Final EICR Report

Landlords are usually required to obtain a report from the electrician in charge of the inspection. The test explains final outcomes and shows if more work such as remedial work is required. The report is to be submitted to the tenant within 28 days of the test.

Inspectors carrying out the test have certain codes they use to classify whether an installation is safe or if it requires urgent attention. Code 1 means “Danger Present.” While Code 2 means the Installation has potential risks.

Areas Where We Provide EICR Service

C & M Electricals provides Electrical Installation Condition Reports in areas across Leicestershire. Some of the areas are Clarendon Park, Knighton, Stoneygate, Aylestone, Westcotes, Winston, and Leicester City Centre.

The document will show that all installations are truly working as they should, helping you to prevent accidents and fire hazards. Your home should be the safest place for you, and what better way to make it safe than to carry out a periodic testing? This way, you can rest assured knowing that everything’s working correctly and you’re not in danger.

Related Articles

With the recent technological developments and advancement, our world is speedily advancing towards a completely digitalised era with technology and innovations in every sphere. From work to recreation, relaxation, and even at home, technology is becoming an undeniable force to be reckoned with. At first, we heard of smartphones, and now it’s smart homes. In the end, it comes down to an attempt to make life as simple and easy as possible.

Research has shown that it is highly possible that by 2040, smart homes would have been universally accepted. Just like only 9% of households had access to the internet in 1998, and the numbers exponentially increased to 90% by 2017, so also the number of homes adopting smart home devices would have multiplied by 2040.

What is a Smart Home?

A smart home is a home with devices, commonly known as smart home devices, which can be controlled remotely by linking to a smartphone or any other device with internet access. It refers to homes with devices connected to the internet which enable them to be remotely monitored and managed. Smart home technology gives its users convenience, security, energy efficiency, and comfort. This is a major part of the internet of things (IoT) as it allows every smart home device to work together cooperating and sharing data from the consumer’s usage.

This could seem to be something you’ve only seen or read about in science fiction, but there are real households who have successfully incorporated smart home devices into their daily lives. According to a survey, almost a quarter of every London home presently uses at least one smart home device. The most popular ones are smart speakers that feature voice recognition, security systems, and thermostats.

A smart home is a component of the internet of things (IoT). The smart devices connected within the system work together to pool consumer usage data, learn the homeowner’s preferences, and use the knowledge to automate actions.

What is a Smart Home Device?

A smart home device is any home device that can be connected to the internet to speed up its performance and spur it to act on its own to a reasonable extent. A smart home device is an innovative concept designed to make living easier, and relatively highly convenient. It possesses the ability to work together, cooperating to give consumers a maximum user experience. Smart home devices include smart bulbs, smart speakers, cameras, sensors, etc. These devices can all be connected to a hub which is what helps them communicate with each other and also with the consumer.

How to Make a Smart Home?

You can either set up your smart home through wireless or hardwired systems. This means that you could either have wires connected to your smart home devices to make them function properly, or you could have them set up through wireless systems. To begin with, you would need to check with your internet service provider if you have a fast enough internet connection as well as confirm if your Wi-Fi area is wide enough.

Secondly, you would need a smart home hub to connect your smart devices. For this, you could go with either the Apple HomeKit, Google Assistant, or Amazon Alexa, depending on your preferences. Once this is installed, safety would be among your next concerns. This would require you to install lights, wireless security cameras, and an effective thermostat to control room temperature.

Here are the top 5 facts about Smart Homes:

1. How to Set Up a Smart Home on a Budget?

Naturally, after reading all the above fantastic features of smart homes and smart home devices, it goes without saying that while you might be considering giving the technology a trial, you might be bothered or hesitant due to the costs that come with such an evolutionary change. However, you can set up a smart home, even if you’re on a small budget. You don’t need millions of pounds before you can control your household devices and appliances by using voice commands. Neither do you need billions to add a surveillance system to your house. With nearly £120, you can do these and even more. There is a group of products that can help you conveniently build a smart home without having to go broke or bankrupt. These include the Echo Dot, (3rd Generation) which is a smart speaker with Alexa, and costs approximately £39.99.

Philips Hue is the smart light bulb and is among the top most products for a Smart Home starting at just £14.99. It can be connected through a hub. It can also be used when the internet goes down.

2. What Does a Smart Home Do?

A smart home has a central system installed either on a mobile or some other device connected to the internet, which the user can use to create time schedules for certain changes to be effected. It also comes with skills that enable it to easily learn their homeowner’s schedules and also make the needed adjustments. A smart home is enabled with control for lighting and electricity to either reduce or increase electricity use. Some smart homes also alert the owners whenever there is any movement in the house, while the owners are away. There are even smarter homes that can call the police or fire department in case of emergencies.

3. How Much Bandwidth Does a Smart Home Use?

A good, strong, and stable reliable internet connection is probably the most important thing you need to successfully integrate your smart home devices and make your home a smart home. Most of the smart home devices do not necessarily require high bandwidth, and so they allow you to easily get away with your present internet speed. This implies that for some smart home devices, your present internet speed can cater to your devices’ connectivity requirement.

4. How to Protect a Smart Home?

As with every great invention, smart homes have a few downsides and the most important one is the security risk it poses. It could leave your entire home vulnerable to cybercriminals and hackers. This Is why you need to take extra precautions to protect your smart home. To start with, move your Wi-Fi router to a more secure router. Then, research the smart devices you want to get to ascertain that they won’t put your entire home at a huge risk.

5. What Does the Smart Home Hub Do?

The Smart Home Hub is the central gadget that is in charge of all your smart home devices. It is like the communication center for the internet of things (IoT) which connects all the devices within the home and enables them to communicate with one another and also easily communicate with you.

Smart Homes, while they may not be the present, yet they are undeniably the future. With the ease, convenience, and efficiency that smart homes promise, there’s every reason for almost every home to be upgraded into a smart home.


C&M Electrical Services have experience of over 25 years. Our team has extremely skilled professionals. Every work done is by a highly skilled team of NICEIC approved electricians who would reach you on time so as to deliver timely work. To provide peace of mind to the customers, passing a DBS check is a must for our electrical engineers. Electrical contracting services are provided to you in different sectors like commercial, industrial, and domestic. No matter where you require our services: at your home or at your business, we’ve got you covered.

Related Articles

With the recent technological developments and advancement, our world is speedily advancing towards a completely digitalised era with technology and innovations in every sphere. From work to recreation, relaxation, and even at home, technology is becoming an undeniable force to be reckoned with. At first, we heard of smartphones, and now it’s smart homes. In the end, it comes down to an attempt to make life as simple and easy as possible.

Research has shown that it is highly possible that by 2040, smart homes would have been universally accepted. Just like only 9% of households had access to the internet in 1998, and the numbers exponentially increased to 90% by 2017, so also the number of homes adopting smart home devices would have multiplied by 2040.

What is a Smart Home?

A smart home is a home with devices, commonly known as smart home devices, which can be controlled remotely by linking to a smartphone or any other device with internet access. It refers to homes with devices connected to the internet which enable them to be remotely monitored and managed. Smart home technology gives its users convenience, security, energy efficiency, and comfort. This is a major part of the internet of things (IoT) as it allows every smart home device to work together cooperating and sharing data from the consumer’s usage.

This could seem to be something you’ve only seen or read about in science fiction, but there are real households who have successfully incorporated smart home devices into their daily lives. According to a survey, almost a quarter of every London home presently uses at least one smart home device. The most popular ones are smart speakers that feature voice recognition, security systems, and thermostats.

A smart home is a component of the internet of things (IoT). The smart devices connected within the system work together to pool consumer usage data, learn the homeowner’s preferences, and use the knowledge to automate actions.

What is a Smart Home Device?

A smart home device is any home device that can be connected to the internet to speed up its performance and spur it to act on its own to a reasonable extent. A smart home device is an innovative concept designed to make living easier, and relatively highly convenient. It possesses the ability to work together, cooperating to give consumers a maximum user experience. Smart home devices include smart bulbs, smart speakers, cameras, sensors, etc. These devices can all be connected to a hub which is what helps them communicate with each other and also with the consumer.

How to Make a Smart Home?

You can either set up your smart home through wireless or hardwired systems. This means that you could either have wires connected to your smart home devices to make them function properly, or you could have them set up through wireless systems. To begin with, you would need to check with your internet service provider if you have a fast enough internet connection as well as confirm if your Wi-Fi area is wide enough.

Secondly, you would need a smart home hub to connect your smart devices. For this, you could go with either the Apple HomeKit, Google Assistant, or Amazon Alexa, depending on your preferences. Once this is installed, safety would be among your next concerns. This would require you to install lights, wireless security cameras, and an effective thermostat to control room temperature.

Here are the top 5 facts about Smart Homes:

1. How to Set Up a Smart Home on a Budget?

Naturally, after reading all the above fantastic features of smart homes and smart home devices, it goes without saying that while you might be considering giving the technology a trial, you might be bothered or hesitant due to the costs that come with such an evolutionary change. However, you can set up a smart home, even if you’re on a small budget. You don’t need millions of pounds before you can control your household devices and appliances by using voice commands. Neither do you need billions to add a surveillance system to your house. With nearly £120, you can do these and even more. There is a group of products that can help you conveniently build a smart home without having to go broke or bankrupt. These include the Echo Dot, (3rd Generation) which is a smart speaker with Alexa, and costs approximately £39.99.

Philips Hue is the smart light bulb and is among the top most products for a Smart Home starting at just £14.99. It can be connected through a hub. It can also be used when the internet goes down.

2. What Does a Smart Home Do?

A smart home has a central system installed either on a mobile or some other device connected to the internet, which the user can use to create time schedules for certain changes to be effected. It also comes with skills that enable it to easily learn their homeowner’s schedules and also make the needed adjustments. A smart home is enabled with control for lighting and electricity to either reduce or increase electricity use. Some smart homes also alert the owners whenever there is any movement in the house, while the owners are away. There are even smarter homes that can call the police or fire department in case of emergencies.

3. How Much Bandwidth Does a Smart Home Use?

A good, strong, and stable reliable internet connection is probably the most important thing you need to successfully integrate your smart home devices and make your home a smart home. Most of the smart home devices do not necessarily require high bandwidth, and so they allow you to easily get away with your present internet speed. This implies that for some smart home devices, your present internet speed can cater to your devices’ connectivity requirement.

4. How to Protect a Smart Home?

As with every great invention, smart homes have a few downsides and the most important one is the security risk it poses. It could leave your entire home vulnerable to cybercriminals and hackers. This Is why you need to take extra precautions to protect your smart home. To start with, move your Wi-Fi router to a more secure router. Then, research the smart devices you want to get to ascertain that they won’t put your entire home at a huge risk.

5. What Does the Smart Home Hub Do?

The Smart Home Hub is the central gadget that is in charge of all your smart home devices. It is like the communication center for the internet of things (IoT) which connects all the devices within the home and enables them to communicate with one another and also easily communicate with you.

Smart Homes, while they may not be the present, yet they are undeniably the future. With the ease, convenience, and efficiency that smart homes promise, there’s every reason for almost every home to be upgraded into a smart home.


C&M Electrical Services have experience of over 25 years. Our team has extremely skilled professionals. Every work done is by a highly skilled team of NICEIC approved electricians who would reach you on time so as to deliver timely work. To provide peace of mind to the customers, passing a DBS check is a must for our electrical engineers. Electrical contracting services are provided to you in different sectors like commercial, industrial, and domestic. No matter where you require our services: at your home or at your business, we’ve got you covered.

Related Articles

Moving into a new home in the United Kingdom (UK) requires certain salient things to be put in place. While getting the perfect sitting arrangement and internal decoration is important, getting your domestic electrical wiring right is paramount as this pertains to the safety of life and property. This article takes you through what you need to know about carrying out a domestic electrical wiring and repair in your home and whether or not you need a registered electrician to get the job done.

What is Domestic Electrical Installation?

Law Insider defines domestic electrical installation as the construction or installation of electrical wiring and the permanent attachment or installation of electrical products in or on any structure that is not itself an electrical product.

However, this is not only limited to first time installation. The maintenance and repair of installed electrical wiring in dwellings is also covered in the scope of domestic electrical wiring or installation.

Domestic electrical installation itself is under the umbrella of Building Regulations and covers the design, installation, inspection and testing of domestic electrical wiring. Building Regulations in the UK got stricter in 2005 when all domestic electrical wiring and domestic electrical testing had to meet the requirements of Part P of the regulations. This includes whether the work was done by a professional or as DIY.

What Is Part P of the Building Regulations?

As stated above, UK residents have to ensure that any notifiable domestic electrical wiring installed after January 2005 complies with Part P of the new Building Regulations. According to Electrical Safety First, electrical wiring in a dwelling is notifiable to a local building control body where the work involves a low voltage or extra-low voltage (typically 230 V) circuit; replacing a fusebox/consumer unit; testing of an existing circuit in special locations (parts of bathrooms).

Non-notifiable work includes everything else such as additions or alterations to existing installations where new circuits are not required.

The Part P of the new Building Regulations is intended to keep families safe from fire, injury or electric shock that may come from the use, maintenance or alteration of the domestic electrical wiring in a dwelling. On April 6, 2013, amendments to the Part P requirements for England took effect.

On April 6, 2013, amendments to the Part P requirements for England took effect.

In the event that you have to sell your property, you would need to present your purchaser’s surveyors with evidence that notifiable domestic electrical wiring complies with Part P of the new Building Regulations.

The UK Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government (gov.uk) provides how to prove compliance. It states that the work must meet up with the applicable requirements of the Building Regulations and that the work on the building must be no more unsatisfactory before the domestic electrical wiring was carried out.

Part P regulations require that socket heights are a minimum of 450mm above floor level, while light switches must be a maximum height of 1.2m from the floor. This, however, does not apply to kitchens and garages.

It is also required that cables are run vertically or horizontally — not diagonally — across walls to sockets and switches. Also, fuseboards in domestic electrical wiring systems must be enclosed in a metal box — not plastic cases. This is as a result of the fact that substandard wiring can cause plastic enclosures to overheat and ignite. Hence, domestic electrical wiring must comply with Building Regulations of using non-combustible materials.

Domestic Electrical Wiring: RCDs, RCBOs & Circuits

The meter which belongs to the electricity board is where electrical systems start from. This is followed by your fuseboard then to the Residual Current Device (RCD), and then it is distributed to the dwelling’s circuits.

Residual Current Devices (RCD) help to halt the flow of electricity in situations where there is an imbalance of electric current from a circuit. When an RCD performs this, it is indicative of the fact that the power going into the circuit, flowing through and returning, is not stable. The importance of an RCD cannot be overemphasized, especially when putting into consideration the need to comply with the Building Regulations. RCDs can prevent instances of life-threatening electric shock.

UK domestic dwellings typically use single-phase supply. However, a three-phase supply is needed if what you’re installing has a high peak load. An inverter can be used to convert a single-phase supply to that of three-phase.

A three-phase supply, however, requires that you use an industrial fuseboard which costs more than the domestic version. Building Regulations also require that you use individual Residual Current Circuit Breakers (RCBOs) with overcurrent protection.

It is needful to have different circuits so that there are other options if one trips. There is also the need to prevent loading of circuits. There should be separate circuits for your lighting, sockets, oven, boiler, electric heater, as well as your heating system. Cable sizes determine the limit to how much load a circuit can take.

Domestic Electric Installation Condition Report

An Electrical Installation Condition Report (EICR), is a periodic inspection report on the safety of the fixed wiring in a domestic dwelling. This domestic electrical testing report has also been labelled as the ‘Landlord Safety Test’ or ‘Homebuyers Test’.

An EICR inspection in your home should be carried out every 10 years. Rented properties should have their domestic electrical testing conducted every 5 years or if a new tenant takes over the place. The EICR ensures that residents are kept safe from any electrical shocks or fires. The tests are conducted by highly qualified electricians.

There are two broad types of domestic EICR. The first is the visual condition report. Domestic electrical testing is not covered under this. This report is recommended for wiring that has recently been tested. The second which the periodic inspection report is more recommended as it is comprehensive and will test all your installations, even to the parts that you would often overlook. It should be noted that domestic dwellings before or during the 1960s are in serious need of EICR.

An effective EICR should find and report any electrical faults that could be hazardous; check electrical installations and wiring to ensure they meet Building Regulations; identify components that could cause electric shocks; keep records of the inspection for future purposes.

C&M electrical contractors provide you excellent and quality work in domestic electrical installation and repair. Our vision is to become the topmost household name in electricals. We assure you to provide all kinds of support you may be looking for. You can also expect timely service with high standards and at the best possible price in the midlands.

REFERENCES

Definition of Electrical Installations, https://www.lawinsider.com/dictionary/electrical-installations

Building regulations in England – Electrical Safety First, https://www.electricalsafetyfirst.org.uk/find-an-electrician/building-regulations/england/

Electrics: The Basics – Homebuilding & Renovating, https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.homebuilding.co.uk/amp/advice/electrics

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/441872/BR_PDF_AD_P_2013.pdf

House wiring for beginners – DIY WIKI, http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/House_Wiring_for_Beginners

Moving into a new home in the United Kingdom (UK) requires certain salient things to be put in place. While getting the perfect sitting arrangement and internal decoration is important, getting your domestic electrical wiring right is paramount as this pertains to the safety of life and property. This article takes you through what you need to know about carrying out a domestic electrical wiring and repair in your home and whether or not you need a registered electrician to get the job done.

What is Domestic Electrical Installation?

Law Insider defines domestic electrical installation as the construction or installation of electrical wiring and the permanent attachment or installation of electrical products in or on any structure that is not itself an electrical product.

However, this is not only limited to first time installation. The maintenance and repair of installed electrical wiring in dwellings is also covered in the scope of domestic electrical wiring or installation.

Domestic electrical installation itself is under the umbrella of Building Regulations and covers the design, installation, inspection and testing of domestic electrical wiring. Building Regulations in the UK got stricter in 2005 when all domestic electrical wiring and domestic electrical testing had to meet the requirements of Part P of the regulations. This includes whether the work was done by a professional or as DIY.

What Is Part P of the Building Regulations?

As stated above, UK residents have to ensure that any notifiable domestic electrical wiring installed after January 2005 complies with Part P of the new Building Regulations. According to Electrical Safety First, electrical wiring in a dwelling is notifiable to a local building control body where the work involves a low voltage or extra-low voltage (typically 230 V) circuit; replacing a fusebox/consumer unit; testing of an existing circuit in special locations (parts of bathrooms).

Non-notifiable work includes everything else such as additions or alterations to existing installations where new circuits are not required.

The Part P of the new Building Regulations is intended to keep families safe from fire, injury or electric shock that may come from the use, maintenance or alteration of the domestic electrical wiring in a dwelling. On April 6, 2013, amendments to the Part P requirements for England took effect.

On April 6, 2013, amendments to the Part P requirements for England took effect.

In the event that you have to sell your property, you would need to present your purchaser’s surveyors with evidence that notifiable domestic electrical wiring complies with Part P of the new Building Regulations.

The UK Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government (gov.uk) provides how to prove compliance. It states that the work must meet up with the applicable requirements of the Building Regulations and that the work on the building must be no more unsatisfactory before the domestic electrical wiring was carried out.

Part P regulations require that socket heights are a minimum of 450mm above floor level, while light switches must be a maximum height of 1.2m from the floor. This, however, does not apply to kitchens and garages.

It is also required that cables are run vertically or horizontally — not diagonally — across walls to sockets and switches. Also, fuseboards in domestic electrical wiring systems must be enclosed in a metal box — not plastic cases. This is as a result of the fact that substandard wiring can cause plastic enclosures to overheat and ignite. Hence, domestic electrical wiring must comply with Building Regulations of using non-combustible materials.

Domestic Electrical Wiring: RCDs, RCBOs & Circuits

The meter which belongs to the electricity board is where electrical systems start from. This is followed by your fuseboard then to the Residual Current Device (RCD), and then it is distributed to the dwelling’s circuits.

Residual Current Devices (RCD) help to halt the flow of electricity in situations where there is an imbalance of electric current from a circuit. When an RCD performs this, it is indicative of the fact that the power going into the circuit, flowing through and returning, is not stable. The importance of an RCD cannot be overemphasized, especially when putting into consideration the need to comply with the Building Regulations. RCDs can prevent instances of life-threatening electric shock.

UK domestic dwellings typically use single-phase supply. However, a three-phase supply is needed if what you’re installing has a high peak load. An inverter can be used to convert a single-phase supply to that of three-phase.

A three-phase supply, however, requires that you use an industrial fuseboard which costs more than the domestic version. Building Regulations also require that you use individual Residual Current Circuit Breakers (RCBOs) with overcurrent protection.

It is needful to have different circuits so that there are other options if one trips. There is also the need to prevent loading of circuits. There should be separate circuits for your lighting, sockets, oven, boiler, electric heater, as well as your heating system. Cable sizes determine the limit to how much load a circuit can take.

Domestic Electric Installation Condition Report

An Electrical Installation Condition Report (EICR), is a periodic inspection report on the safety of the fixed wiring in a domestic dwelling. This domestic electrical testing report has also been labelled as the ‘Landlord Safety Test’ or ‘Homebuyers Test’.

An EICR inspection in your home should be carried out every 10 years. Rented properties should have their domestic electrical testing conducted every 5 years or if a new tenant takes over the place. The EICR ensures that residents are kept safe from any electrical shocks or fires. The tests are conducted by highly qualified electricians.

There are two broad types of domestic EICR. The first is the visual condition report. Domestic electrical testing is not covered under this. This report is recommended for wiring that has recently been tested. The second which the periodic inspection report is more recommended as it is comprehensive and will test all your installations, even to the parts that you would often overlook. It should be noted that domestic dwellings before or during the 1960s are in serious need of EICR.

An effective EICR should find and report any electrical faults that could be hazardous; check electrical installations and wiring to ensure they meet Building Regulations; identify components that could cause electric shocks; keep records of the inspection for future purposes.

C&M electrical contractors provide you excellent and quality work in domestic electrical installation and repair. Our vision is to become the topmost household name in electricals. We assure you to provide all kinds of support you may be looking for. You can also expect timely service with high standards and at the best possible price in the midlands.

REFERENCES

Definition of Electrical Installations, https://www.lawinsider.com/dictionary/electrical-installations

Building regulations in England – Electrical Safety First, https://www.electricalsafetyfirst.org.uk/find-an-electrician/building-regulations/england/

Electrics: The Basics – Homebuilding & Renovating, https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.homebuilding.co.uk/amp/advice/electrics

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/441872/BR_PDF_AD_P_2013.pdf

House wiring for beginners – DIY WIKI, http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/House_Wiring_for_Beginners